French cuisine has become synonymous with ‘good food’, and any self-respecting foodie will consider the country a must-visit destination. One of France’s most popular and distinguished products is, of course, cheese; with a fantastic selection of regional varieties, many of which are still made using traditional farmhouse methods. Why not make your next French getaway truly scrumptious and pay a visit to a few of these celebrated cheese-making hotspots? 

Roquefort-sur-Soulzon

Situated in the Aveyron département of the Midi-Pyrénées, this southern French village has long been famed for its cheese. Made with carefully selected sheep’s milk, Roquefort cheese is laid on oak shelves where it can mature in the darkness of cellars, until it has attained its robust flavour and instantly recognisable mottled blue mould. When visiting Roquefort-sur-Soulzon, you can take a tour of the famous Cambalou caves, which were once used to house the cheese, as well as the Societe cellars, where you can discover more about how it’s made.

Morbier

The Franche-Comté region that borders Switzerland produces a range of well-known cheeses, including Bleu de Geu and French Emmental. One of the most delicious varieties is Morbier, hailing from the village of the same name. The cheese can be aged for as long as four months, creating that recognisable tang, soft texture and thin black vein running through its centre. The village itself is peaceful and cosy, so a great option for those looking for a quiet getaway. Visit during the winter months to take advantage of great skiing conditions.

Camembert

This soft, creamy cow’s milk cheese is named after the small village situated in the Orne département of Normandy. If you’re driving from England, this picturesque village in the north of France is a brilliant choice for a long weekend break. Find out about the history of Camembert cheese and its method of production with a visit to the Président Farm, where you can attend great taster sessions, and later stop off at the historic manor house Manoir de Beaumoncel.

Auvergne

Located in central France, Auvergne produces classic cheeses like Bleu d’Auvergne, Cantal and Fourme d’Ambert. This mountainous region is dominated by the Massif-Central range, with dramatic and rugged scenery – perfect for walking off all that cheese! Stay in the capital Clermont-Ferrand for lots to see and do – the stunning Rouge Cottage situated nearby, and would make the ideal place to stay for a large group of family or friends, with room for up to 18 guests. With spacious grounds, a swimming pool, hill-top views and local facilities for fishing, horse-riding and balloon flights, it’s a wonderful choice for an active foodie getaway.

Related Articles:
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French Bread 101
– The Best Food Festivals in France
– The Four Best French Regions For Quality Local Produce
– More blogs about Culture & Food
– More blogs about France

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